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SEV defends redtape-busting proposals, union reply

Δημοσίευση 3 Δεκεμβρίου 2010, 10:13 / Ανανεώθηκε 27 Ιουνίου 2013, 14:55
SEV defends redtape-busting proposals, union reply
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Federation of Hellenic Enterprises (SEV) President Dimitris Daskalopoulos on Thursday reacted to criticism by the General Confederation of Workers of Greece (GSEE), the country’s largest umbrella trade union, over a "laundry list" of SEV proposals presented a day earlier -- proposals aimed at eliminating numerous and often arcane obstacles to entrepreneurship in the country.

Federation of Hellenic Enterprises (SEV) President Dimitris Daskalopoulos on Thursday reacted to criticism by the General Confederation of Workers of Greece (GSEE), the country’s largest umbrella trade union, over a "laundry list" of SEV proposals presented a day earlier -- proposals aimed at eliminating numerous and often arcane obstacles to entrepreneurship in the country.

Speaking on the sidelines of a conference hosted by the Hellenic Management Association (HMA), Daskalopoulos reiterated that GSEE leadership was present at Wednesday’s meeting, held with so-called "social partners" at SEV’s offices, noting, in fact, that negotiations with GSEE representatives lasted for six hours.

The comment came hours after GSEE President Yiannis Panagopoulos flatly denied reports of an agreement between GSEE and employers for a reduction in private sector wages, calling reports "fabricated" and an "orchestrated vileness that serves the interests of employers' circles". Moreover, he GSEE's demand for collective labour agreements and their universal application and extension.

On his part, Daskalopoulos said that while no agreement reached, a discussion with social partners was held regarding an agreement that will consolidate the flexibility and validity of collective work contracts.

Moreover, Daskalopoulos downgraded the proposals concerning a 6-day work week and overtime work, by saying that of the 250 impediments to entrepreneurship, recorded by SEV, “those who are fervent supporters of stagnation chose to focus on one or two technical-economic points of a lesser importance, maintaining that allegedly the (SEV) proposals were suggesting abolition of the eight-hour-day / five-day work week.”

The SEV president spoke of slander, misquoting, and an effort to manipulate public opinion.

He also stressed that reactions expressed "voice certain interests", and stereotypes that prefer to turn a blind eye to reality and condemn the people to indigence in order to preserve their own privileges.

Finally, he underlined that the need for change has become obvious but lacks political and social momentum due to the numerous and deeply-rooted interests that give a fight to keep things unchanged in order to preserve their political, “closed-shop”, or individual privileges.