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Maniatis at SEV symposium on building energy efficiency

Δημοσίευση 9 Δεκεμβρίου 2010, 10:54 / Ανανεώθηκε 27 Ιουνίου 2013, 14:55
Maniatis at SEV symposium on building energy efficiency
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Greece's "unbelievable bureaucracy" was to blame for the delay in proclaiming the 'Saving at Home' programme for improving home energy efficiency, Deputy Environment Minister Yiannis Maniatis said on Wednesday.

Greece's "unbelievable bureaucracy" was to blame for the delay in proclaiming the 'Saving at Home' programme for improving home energy efficiency, Deputy Environment Minister Yiannis Maniatis said on Wednesday.

Under the programme, low-income home owners will be able to obtain low-interest loans and subsidies in order to carry out home improvements that lead to lower energy consumption.

"The funds have been secured, the European Commission agrees, there are beneficiaries, the market wants it and the regulations for the programme are ready but unbelievable Greek bureaucracy delays," the minister said.

Maniatis said the governments that would run the funding programme had been selected, naming National Bank of Greece, Piraeus Bank, Eurobank and Alpha Bank, and all that now remained was for their legal services to sign off on the deal.

The minister also urged households to apply for inclusion in the Social Domestic Power Rate, noting that the estimated number of beneficiaries were 1.2 million and that applications now stood at just 70,000.

Maniatis was speaking at a symposium organised by the Hellenic Federation of Enterprises (SEV) οn improving building energy efficiency.

Other speakers stressed that Greece's buildings were among the least energy-efficient in Europe since 60 percent had been built before rules for the energy insulation of buildings were introduced in 1980. Energy efficiency expert Prof. Manthos Santamouris presented figures predicting that energy consumption by Greek households would rise by 40 percent by the year 2050 unless corrective action was taken, with most power spent on cooling buildings as temperatures climbed due to global warming.

Santamouris said the target was to restrict the rise in domestic power consumption to 28 percent and said the cost of converting all Attica buildings to zero consumption would be 77 billion euros.

During the symposium, Maniatis also announced that a Greek city, possibly Athens or Thessaloniki, might be included in the massive "Smart Cities" programme worth 11 billion euro. Up to 30 European cities will participate in the programme, which is based mainly on new bioclimatic buildings, new energy networks and new mobility.