ENGLISH

Negotiation process not going as expected says Cyprus President Christofias

Δημοσίευση 16 Δεκεμβρίου 2010, 10:04 / Ανανεώθηκε 27 Ιουνίου 2013, 14:55
Negotiation process not going as expected says Cyprus President Christofias
Facebook Twitter Whatsapp

Developments regarding the Cyprus problem are not going as expected, Cyprus President Demetris Christofias said here on Tuesday, adding that the Republic of Cyprus bears no responsibility for this.

Developments regarding the Cyprus problem are not going as expected, Cyprus President Demetris Christofias said here on Tuesday, adding that the Republic of Cyprus bears no responsibility for this.

The Cypriot president was speaking during the ceremony where he was awarded the status of honorary graduate of Political Science and Public Administration of the Law, Economics and Political Sciences Department of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, which took place Tuesday afternoon.

Referring to the ongoing UN led negotiation process between himself and the leader of the T/c community Dervis Eroglu he stressed that it is up to Ankara to unlock the deadlock, noting however that this does not mean that he underestimates the ongoing dialogue, the only process which may lead to a solution.

"Turkey", he underlined "must be at last convinced to use her decisive role towards solving the Cyprus problem", adding that this would strengthen its accession process and the chances it has to become a full member of the EU.

"We managed to sufficiently clarify the basis of negotiations," he said, adding that for the first time the T/c side committed itself to one state, with a single sovereignty, a single nationality and a single international personality, whilst at the same time an arbitration free procedure without artificial time limits was ensured steering the procedure away from past dangers.

"We have entered the discussions in good will," he noted, "and we submit proposals within the framework of UN SC Resolutions," adding that the

proposals are based on principles and are realistic at the same time.

The Turkish side, however, he said, is not as constructive, given that at a recent party congress Eroglu reaffirmed his support for "two states, two sovereignties, two people in Cyprus", a position on which the T/c leader stands firm whilst at the same time initiatives originating both from Eroglu and Turkey are being undertaken promoting the upgrading of the occupied areas.

The Cyprus government's multi-level foreign policy working in parallel with the negotiation process aims to help towards the achievement of a solution of the Cyprus problem, by activating the support of friendly states within and outside of the UN SC as "a safety clause for Cyprus", he said.

"Our vision," President Christofias said, "is to achieve a solution of a bi-zonal, bi-communal federation, embodied in a state with a single sovereignty, a single nationality and a single international personality, in which the human rights and basic freedoms of all citizens are respected."

"We wish for a solution based on international and European law, a free and prosperous country for all its citizens G/cs, T/cs, Maronites, Armenians and Latins," he said.

"Our vision is for a Cyprus which will be a bridge of joint understanding and creativity between different cultures, languages, religions and nationalities," he noted, adding that a reunited Cyprus has much to offer to the EU.

Turkey could make a realistic claim for full EU accession if such a solution was reached, he said, adding that it would also contribute to the creation of security and prosperity conditions in the greater area of the Southeastern Mediterranean.

Cyprus was de facto divided after the Turkish invasion of 1974. UN led negotiations are ongoing for the achievement of a comprehensive solution to the problem.